A Look at Superfoods: Oatmeal

Superfoods: Oatmeal

oatmeal

A 16 week look at Superfoods

 


This Week’s Featured Superfood: Oatmeal

I hated otameal as a kid, but as an adult I really love it and find it to be a comfort food, soothing and warm. I also enjoy the flavor possibilities, every day something different, if I want.  Understanding that oatmeal is rich in vitamins and minerals as well as fiber and protein, which makes it even better and a great brainy breakfast!

Trivia

  • Oatmeal is a whole grain! You can buy rolled or steal cut, but they still have the bran/germ
  • Eaten three hours before working out some studies show it may help improve endurance
  • A daily bowl of unrefined whole grain cereals has been shown to reduce heart failure by 29%
  • The Ancient Greeks were the first people to make something similar to the oatmeal we eat today, a type of warm porridge
  • 75% of all US families have oatmeal in their homes right now

 

What’s in it for me?

Beta Glucan , a soluble fiber that binds with cholesterol to help keep it from being absorbed in the body.  Beta Glucan also helps fight certain cancers, infections, stabalizes blood sugar,

Avenanthramides- Antioxident properties as well as anti-inflammitory benefits.  Helps with cardiovascular health.  Help prevent free radical damage, May help prevent atherosclerosis.

Protein –  4 grams.  Protein serves as building blocks for muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, hormones,  and enzymes.  They increases satiety helping us feel more full.

Manganese –  Benefits bone formation, balance of sex hormones,  important in thyroid function, absorption of calcium, metabolism of fat and carbohydrates, helps the immune system, and is important to function of connective tissues.

Fiber – fiber is an important and necessary part of our diet and most of us don’t get enough. Known as roughage or bulk it is the parts of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes that our bodies can’t digest.  We need both soluble and insoluble fiber to be health.  soluble fiber dissolves in water and becomes gel like and helps our glucose levels and cholesterol.  insoluble fiber helps our digestive system move along and bulks up our stool.  fiber helps our bowl movements be regular, lower cholesterol, maintain blood sugar levels, and provide satiety which can help control our weight.

Summary: A nice warm bowl of oatmeal is a filling choice with studies showing that it keeps people more satisfied for longer than many other choices.  It a meal that can help lower cholesterol, improve both HDL and LDL, reduce cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and help prevent certain cancers.  Combined with a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables oatmeal is a great tool to add to your self care regime!

As easy as it is to make oatmeal try to use whole oats or steel cut oats and avoid the instant to get the most nutrients possible.


Recipes

13 Insanely Cleaver Oatmeal Tricks you need to try – Buzzfeed

Refrigerator Oatmeal – Kitchen Confidential (use the basic recipe and try your own flavors)

Carrot Cake Oatmeal – Lauren’s Latest

20 Savory Oatmeals – Eat This, Not That

Savory Curry Cashew Oatmeal – Eating Well Magazine

 

Try making an oatmeal bar for your family one Saturday morning.  Let everyone make  there own creation and then tell the family about it over breakfast.


What is a Superfood?

A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources:

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2009/12/The-Immune-Enhancing-Benefits-of-Beta-Glucans/Page-01

Health Benefits of Manganese

 

 

A Look at Superfoods: Olive Oil

Superfoods: Olive Oil

olive oil

A 16 week look at Superfoods


This Week’s Featured Superfood: Olive Oil

Olive oil has been used for thousands of years and is at  the heart of the well researched Mediterranean Diet, which is a heart healthy, longe life way of eating.  Though olive oil contains almost no vitamins or minerals it is still considered a superfood due to the tremendous amount of health benefits.  Olive is a mono-unsaturated fat, an Omega-6 fat, and though beneficial keep in mind it is calorically dense and should be used in moderation.

Olive is what we call a “right fat”, if you aren’t using olive oil it might be time for an oil change!

Trivia

  • The oldest Olive tree in the world is over 5000 years old and still produces fruit, it is on the island of Crete
  • The average lifespan for an Olive tree is 500 years
  • In 1774 Thomas Jefferson planted 1500 Olive stones at Monticello, but they never yielded as the climate was unfavorable
  • Thomas Jefferson said that the Olive tree contributes the most to the happiness of mankind.
  • The smoke point is 365 f
  • For frying use light olive oil
  • For medium heat it is ok to use extra virgin olive oil
  • For dressings and no heat use extra virgin olive oil for more flavor

What’s in it for me?

  • Extra Virgin olive oil is the most nutrient dense of the olive oils
  • Those who consume primarily olive oil and Omega-3 oils have lower blood pressure
  • Regular, moderate consumption of olive oil reduces inflammation
  • Studies show regular, moderate consumption of olive oil to have anti-cancer properties
  • Lowers LDL
  • Raises HDL
  • Keep the lining of the arteries smooth
  • Regular, moderate consumption is proven to reduce the risk of heart disease
  • Olive oil is rich in polyphenols which is the basis for many of the health benefits
  • Protects the lower digestive tract
  • Rich with antioxidants
  • Rich in Vitamin E which protects against pollutants, PMS, eye disorders, Alzheimer’s and Diabetes
  • Rich in Vitamin K which is key in regulating normal blood clotting, and may be helpful for bone health and reduce bone loss
  • Olive oil can increase feelings of satiety and fullness
  • Helps create more regular stools
  • A study in the American Journal of Nutrition found that just smelling olive oil helped in weight loss!

Learn more about olive oil at the California Olive Oil Council

 


Recipes

Canal House Classic House Vinaigrette,  I like to substitute balsamic vinegar or flavored Balsamic for variety

Olive Garden’s Capellini Pomodoro

The 10 Best Olive Oil Recipes, the Gaurdian

Orange Olive Oil Cake  (for a treat)

Chimichurri

One of our favorite ways to consume olive oil is with a fresh-baked whole grain bread and dip it right into the oil.  Yum!


What is a Superfood?

A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olive_oil

http://epochproducts.com/blog/the-health-benefits-of-extra-virgin-olive-oil/

What Does “Extra Virgin” Mean?

Sears, William MD, Sears, Martha, RN – Prime-Time Health 2010 Little Brown and Company

DeWitt, Dave, The Founding Foodies, 2010, Sourcebooks

 

A Look at Superfoods: Broccoli

Superfoods: Broccoli

Broccoli

A 16 week look at Superfoods

 


This Week’s Featured Superfood: Broccoli

Broccoli is an amazing superhero of superfoods filled with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients with only a small amount of calories per serving!  You should definitely eat your broccoli!   Broccoli retains the most nutritional value when eaten raw, but if you don’t care for it raw you can lightly steam it and retain much of the goodness!

Trivia

  • Did you know that Thomas Jefferson planted Broccoli at Monticello in as early as 1767?
  • The word broccoli comes from the Italian “broccolo” meaning “The flowering crest of cabbage”.
  • Broccoli was popular in Italy as far back as the 6th century, but was slow reaching the rest of the world.
  • Broccoli is a good source of both soluble and insoluble fiber!

 

What’s in it for me?

Potassium , 288 grams of potassium in one cup!  That is a lot.  Potassium,  Helps the heart, kidneys, cells, digestive system, muscles, and regulates flood balance and blood pressure.  Potassium has may help reduce the risk of stroke.

Vitamin C, one cup has 135% of the Daily Value- Good for eye health, cardiovascular health,  repairs and regenerates tissue, decreases LDL, decrease triglycerides, is an antioxidant working against free radicals and may protect against certain types of cancer.  Vitamin C also may help reduce the effects of nitrates in food and aids in the absorption of Iron.

Vitamin A  11-13% DV– Vital in the growth of bone, key for good vision, important for a healthy immune system,  helps our skin and mucus membranes by protecting against bacteria and viruses and is helpful in reproduction.

Lutine -Zeaxanthin –  may help prevent age related Macular Degeneration and cataracts and may help prevent clogging of the arteries of the neck and may help the health of your skin.

Protein –  4 grams.  Protein serves as building blocks for muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, hormones,  and enzymes.  They increases satiety helping us feel more full.

Sulforaphane – An antioxidant, sulforaphane is thought to reduce the risk of breast, bladder, colon and prostate cancer!

Fiber – fiber is an important and necessary part of our diet and most of us don’t get enough. Known as roughage or bulk it is the parts of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes that our bodies can’t digest.  We need both soluble and insoluble fiber to be health.  soluble fiber dissolves in water and becomes gel like and helps our glucose levels and cholesterol.  insoluble fiber helps our digestive system move along and bulks up our stool.  fiber helps our bowl movements be regular, lower cholesterol, maintain blood sugar levels, and provide satiety which can help control our weight.

Summary: Eating broccoli may help lower cholesterol, reduce the risk of certain cancers, is good for the immune system, may improve blood pressure, kidney function, and heart health!  Pile it on!!


Recipes

Pan Steamed Broccoli – Alton Brown

10 Family Friendly Broccoli recipes – Real Simple

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt – Food and Wine Magazine

Garlic Parmesan Roasted Broccoli – Damn Delicious (Unsolicited side note, I love this blog!! We have never had a bad recipe from it.  Seriously y’all, cook her stuff!)

Southern Broccoli Salad – Paula Deen

Don’t forget the veggie tray!  Make your own dressings, they are very easy and you can avoid preservitives, additives, hydrogenated fats and gmos!


What is a Superfood?

A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/11/09/broccoli-benefits.aspx

http://www.livescience.com/45408-broccoli-nutrition.html

http://www.phytochemicals.info/phytochemicals/sulforaphane.php

http://www.choosemyplate.gov/protein-foods

Sears, William MD, Sears, Martha, RN – Prime-Time Health 2010 Little Brown and Company

DeWitt, Dave, The Founding Foodies, 2010, Sourcebooks

 

A Look at Superfoods: Avocado

Superfoods: Avocado 

avocado

A 16 week look at Superfoods

 


This Week’s Featured Superfood: Avocado

Avocado’s can sometimes be vilified because of the high fat content, but have no fear this superfood is here to save the day!  Avocados contain 20 essential nutrients, have more potassium than bananas, and contain vitamins A, Bs, E plus folic acid.  Enjoy, but as with anything remember moderation.

Mono-unsaturated Fats –  Shown to be beneficial to the heart when eaten in moderation and a replacement for saturated fats (though recent research is showing saturated fat to be safer than once thought).  Can help lower LDL cholesterol and reduce risks of stroke and heart attack, may improve function of blood vessels and may help insulin levels

Potassium –  Helps the heart, kidneys, cells, digestive system, muscles, and regulates flood balance and blood pressure.  Potassium has may help reduce the risk of stroke.

Vitamin C – Good for eye health, cardiovascular health,  repairs and regenerates tissue, decreases LDL, decrease triglycerides, is an antioxidant working against free radicals and may protect against certain types of cancer.  Vitamin C also may help reduce the effects of nitrates in food and aids in the absorption of Iron.

Vitamin A – Vital in the growth of bone, key for good vision, important for a healthy immune system,  helps our skin and mucus membranes by protecting against bacteria and viruses and is helpful in reproduction.

Lutine -Zeaxanthin –  may help prevent age related Macular Degeneration and cataracts and may help prevent clogging of the arteries of the neck and may help the health of your skin.

Magnesium – Is important for muscle function and health, improves energy, and regulates of calcium, potassium, and sodium.


Recipes

Spicy Avocado and Peas Tea Sandwiches – Food and Wine Magazine

avocado Hummus Dip – Food and Wine Magazine

Avocado Baked Eggs – Six Sisters Stuff

Pink Grapefruit and Avocado Salad – Eating Well Magazine

Good Green Tea Smoothie – Eating Well Magazine

and don’t forget Avocado toast and Guacamole!


What is a Superfood?

A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!

A Look at Superfoods: Tomatoes

Superfoods: Tomatoes

tomato

A 16 week look at Superfoods

 

This Week’s Featured Superfood: Tomatoes

Tomatoes have quite the history from being considered poisonous to being caught in the great fruit or vegetable debate, but no matter the drama tomatoes are packed full of healthful nutrients making it one of our 16 superfoods.

What makes Tomatoes so super?

  • Vitamin C  – Good for eye health, cardiovascular health,  repairs and regenerates tissue, decreases LDL, decrease triglycerides, is an antioxidant working against free radicals and may protect against certain types of cancer.  Vitamin C also may help reduce the effects of nitrates in food and aids in the absorption of Iron
  • Vitamin A – Vital in the growth of bone, key for good vision, important for a healthy immune system,  helps our skin and mucus membranes by protecting against bacteria and viruses and is helpful in reproduction.
  • Potassium – Helps the heart, kidneys, digestive system, muscles, and regulates flood balance and blood pressure.  Potassium has may help reduce the risk of stroke.
  • Lycopene – cancer preventing properties, heart healthy properties, protects the skin from UV rays, may be preventative against atherosclerosis and is helpful in preventing the damage of free radicals in the cells.  Healthy oils may help increase absorption of Lycopene.
  • Lutine -Zeaxanthin –  may help prevent age related Macular Degeneration and cataracts and may help prevent clogging of the arteries of the neck.

This makes tomatoes a mighty Superfood!  Enjoy!

Note: Tomatoes are often Genetically Modified, while the USDA says GMO’s are safe it is my personal feeling that there is not enough evidence either way and when in doubt it is better to be more conservative in your choice.  That said, if you are unable to find Non-GMO tomatoes please eat the tomato, it is too rich in vitamins and nutrients to pass it by.

Recipes

Bruchetta – The Pioneer Woman

Crapese Salad Skewers – The Gingham Apron

Stuffed Tomatoes – Sunny Anderson

Gazpacho – Wolfgang Puck

Sausage Meatballs with Red Gravy – Emeril  (This recipe may be adapted to make it healthier)

Classic Marinara Sauce – NY Times

And don’t forget the basic Tomato sandwich!


Fruit or vegetable? Botanically speaking, fruit.  But…under customs law they are vegetables.  To learn more visit NPR’s “When the Supreme Court Decided Fruits Were Vegetables”.

Tomatoes are part of the dangerous Night Shade family and were considered to be poisonous at one time, mainly by the British and early Americans.  Though the tomato itself is safe, the leaves are not and should not be consumed.


What is a Superfood?  A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!

A Look at Superfoods: Berries

Superfoods: Berries

Strawberries

A 16 week look at Superfoods

What is a Superfood?  A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!

This Week’s Featured Superfood: Berries

Berries are full of phytonutrients, antioxidants, and packed with vitamins.

  • Blueberries – The super berry of the berries, they have anti-inflammatory nutrients and have been shown to  improve the neurotransmitter function of the brain, help blood flow and cardiovascular health, lessen the risk of cancer, improve memory, improve vision, and decrease belly fat.
  • Strawberries – High in phenols, high in antioxidants, especially Vitamin C.  May be helpful in preventing cataracts and macular degeneration, cancer fighter and prevents collagen destruction and inflammation thereby helping with wrinkles
  • Blackberries – High in cancer fighting compounds,  may help lower cholesterol, prevents collagen destruction,  high levels of antioxidants, helps with digestive health, and heart health.
  • Cherries – May promote cell and tissue health as well as reduce arthritis pain, help us sleep better, prevent wrinkles, reduce belly fat, lower risk of stroke.

In addition to these berries try some less common berries such as goji, bilberries.  Each berry has its own unique set of phytonutrients and antioxidants, so mix it up and add a wide variety of berries into your diet and enjoy this superfood.


How to get more berries into your diet

Add them to yogurt, cereal, or as toppings on pancakes or make a smoothie.

Spinach and Strawberry Salad

Blueberry and Kale Grain Salad

Baby Kale and Blackberry Salad

Grilled Salmon with Quick Blueberry Pan Sauce

Berry Superfood Smoothie Recipe

1 cup of greek yogurt*

1/2 Blueberries*

4-5 Strawberries*

1/2 cup Blackberries*

Vanilla or Strawberry protein powder, my favorite is Shaklee Life Shake

A handful of ice

1/2 banana

1 cup spinach*

Additional liquid to make smooth: Pomegranate* juice,milk, apple juice,  other.

Blend until smooth adding the additional liquid of choice to reach the consistency you desire.

*Superfood

 

 

 

Chickpea, Avocado Spread

chickpea avocado

I have seen several recipes floating around the internet blending chickpea and avocado to make a sandwich spread and decided to play around with it and see what I thought.   I found it to be good for a sandwich spread, but not all by itself.  I recommend lettuce, tomato, red onion, and sprouts and then use the spread like a thick condiment.

This spread also works well as a hummus type dip with chips.  It is a great way to add more legumes into your diet and utilize the healthy fats found in avocado.   Check out some nutrition info below.

Chickpea (Garbanzo bean) and Avocado Spread

1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed.  Reserve liquid in case it is needed to thin down the spread

1 avocado

2-3 cloves garlic

juice of 1/2 lemon

1/4 cup Tahini paste

1 tsp fresh Cilantro

Salt and Pepper to taste

Feel free to add other ingredients like hot sauce, jalapenos, red pepper flakes etc. to spice it up a bit!

 

A little health information

  • Chickpeas are loaded with fiber and potassium.  Just one tablespoon has 2.2 grams of fiber and 109 mg of potassium (per google nutrition).  Chickpeas are also a great source or folic acid and protein and Iron!
  • Avocados sometimes get bad press because they are so fatty, but it is a heart healthy monounsaturated fat. (This doesn’t mean eat all you want, still be wise )  Avocados are rich in vitamins A, B, E, Folic Acid.  Plus Avocados are high in lutein and zeaxanthin which are healthy for your eyes!
  • Tahini is another fatty item that has heart healthy fats in it. 2% of the fat is saturated, but new studies are showing this is not as upsetting as it used to be.  One ounce of Tahini has as much iron as one ounce of liver and has significant levels of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and your whole day’s worth of thiamin.

So spread on this dip/spread and enjoy!  You are making good food choices!

Need Potassium? Eat your Veg!

Roasted Vegetables 

veg

Recipe below

According to http://www.nutritionfacts.org less than 2% of Americans meet their recommended  minimum adequate intake of potassium.   This is in large part to our avoidance of veggies!  So, what’s the big deal you ask?  I thought potassium was just for cramps.  I don’t have cramps; so, I’m good right?  Wrong.  Let’s have a crash course in potassium.

Potassium“It is also an electrolyte, a substance that conducts electricity in the body, along with sodium, chloride, calcium, and magnesium. Potassium is crucial to heart function and plays a key role in skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, making it important for normal digestive and muscular function”. – University of Maryland.

Ok, so what does it do?

  • Helps maintain the balance of electrolytes in your body
  • Helps your kidneys filter blood
  • Helps the heart beat
  • Helps manage blood pressure
  • Helps the muscles contract
  • Helps deliver oxygen to the brain which helps your cognitive abilities
  • Helps metabolism by helping to release energy from protein, carbs, and fats
  • Helps your nervous system

Wow, that’s a lot!  It looks like potassium is more important that I thought!  How do I get more in my diet? Eat your veggies!

It is important to have a healthy balance of potassium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium and the best way to get this balance is trough a variety of whole food! Real foods; eat all the colors! in other words, eat food that rots, but eat it before it does and you will be on your way to reaching your goals.

You don’t have to eat bananas all day to get your potassium, it can be found in many foods.  Here are a few:

  • Dark greens
  • Beans
  • Blackstrap Molasses
  • Potatoes
  • Bananas
  • Fish
  • Prunes
  • Zucchini
  • Milk
  • Yellow Squash
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Tomato sauces (watch the sodium)
  • Yogurt
  • Clams
  • Orange Juice

All of these foods are packed with other nutrients our bodies need too.  To get the most out of your foods try putting foods together that help the body better absorb the nutrients, such as olive oil on your veg to help your body better absorb fat soluable vitamins like A, D, E and K or eat vitamin C with Iron rich food to help your body better absorb the iron. Try serving broccoli with your steak!

Here is a potassium packed dish to get you started:

Roasted Vegetables, 1-2 servings – I eat this as one serving as part of a yummy lunch!

  • 1 zucchini
  • 1 yellow, crook neck squash
  • 1/2 onion
  • 1 large radish
  • 1/2 cup mushrooms
  • 1/4 – 1/2 tsp Olive Oil

Chop the vegetables in large chunks and toss in olive oil and your favorite seasoning, I used Greek Seasoning from Penzey’s spices.  Then Roast at 425 for 15 minutes or desired firmness. The crispier the better! That is it!  It is very easy to roast vegetables and it brings out amazing flavor.

According to Caloriecount.com this one bowl of veggies comes in at 1, 159 mg of potassium.  The daily recommendation is 4700, so it isn’t enough, but it is a good start. Plus it has 6.5 g protein, 6.4 g fiber,  785 IU vitamin A, 75 mg vitamin C,  81 mg Calcium, and  2.8 mg Iron!  That is a powerhouse bowl of veggies!

Try adding kale to your smoothies and finding a way to add fruits and veggies to every meal.  If you do this on a regular basis, your taste buds will begin to love it and your body will crave it, and you will find it is easy to meet your potassium needs.

Today I had the veggies above and a smoothie with homemade yogurt, strawberries, banana, a cup of kale, 1 cup of milk and 2 scoops Shaklee Life Shake.  This brought my potassium up to  3028 mg for the day so far!  Looking good!


I try to buy organic veg etables and non-gmo foods because I feel it is the best choice for our family, but they can be more expensive and it is better to eat your veggies then to skip them all together because organic was too expensive.  Do what you can as you can!

 

 

Roasted Salmon Review – Hello Fresh

Review: Roasted Salmon with Burst Cherry Tomatoes

and Green Beans – Hello Fresh

bbd salmon 1

 


The Link:  ROASTED SALMON WITH BURST CHERRY TOMATOES AND GREEN BEANS – HELLO FRESH

Time:  35 Minutes

Ease:  Moderate

Review:  I found this recipe through Hello Fresh, one of the popular subscription meal box services available online.  I have not subscribed to the service, but I like the recipe options they have available.  They seem to be pretty healthy and fresh.

The flavors of this dish were great and overall it was pretty easy to make.  The biggest issue to watch is that there are several steps and it can be a little challenging to feel that everything is running efficiently.  If you subscribe to the service each ingredient is exactly what you need which would help with organization in the kitchen.

Here are few tips:

  1.  Olive is is a great choice for any dish, it is a monounsaturated fatty acid and can lower LDL and have an impact on blood pressure.  It is also anti-inflammatory and can help keep the lining of the arteries smooth.  Watch your temperature as you cook, cooking beyond the smoke point can cause the oil to lose its health benefits and may produce chemicals that could be harmful.  The higher the quality of olive oil the higher the smoke point.
  2. This recipe calls for 1 Tablespoon of butter and new science has found that saturated fat isn’t as bad as we thought, but if you are worried about it, you can replace it with olive oil or lower the amount and mix with olive oil.
  3. When you pull the Salmon out of the oven you may see white goo on the top.  No worries, it is albumin, which is protein that comes to the surface from the muscle fibers.  It is harmless coagulated protein and even the most perfectly cooked fish is prone to it.  Try not to over cook as this will make it worse.  To learn more visit America’s Test Kitchen.
  4. Watch the potatoes.  I had small potatoes, but needed more that 15 minutes for them to become tender.
  5. My biggest struggle with this recipe was the size of my pot.  I used a large pot to blanch the green beans and boil the potatoes then tried to use the same pot to cook the tomatoes and crisp the green beans in.  There was not enough room in my pot to spread things out enough and I suggest using 1 pot and 1 large bottomed pan.
  6. Watching your carbs or fat?  This dish may scare you both away, coming in at 41 grams carbs and 34 grams fats, but keep in mind these are “right” or “good” carbs and fats.  Meaning they are complex carbohydrates and more Omega 3, healthy fats than other fats.  Studies also show that when you combine carbs with fat and protein it slows down the process of converting the carbs into sugars. Plus there is a whopping 41 grams of protein and 7 grams of fiber! So enjoy this nice heart, brain, colon, inflammation friendly meal!

bbd salmon2

Easy Fish Tacos

fish tacos

Easy Fish Tacos

Eating fatty fish (salmon, char, herring, mackerel, sardines and trout) a couple times a week is a great way to add healthy sources of protein, vitamins and minerals including omega-3 fatty acids.

Benefits of Omega -3 fatty acids:

  • Improved delivery of oxygen and nutrients to cells because of reduced blood viscosity
  • Enhanced aerobic metabolism
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Promotes a healthy heart
  • Improves functioning of the nervous system
  • Helps balance hormones
  • Reduces cholesterol
  • New studies are showing evidence that Omega – 3 fatty acids may aid depression, ADD, and sleep

The Recipe

1 pound fish of your choice

1 can Rotel

1 Tsp Chili powder or 1 chopped pepper in adobo sauce

1/2 tsp cumin

Juice of 1 lime

(OPT.) Splash of Tequila

Corn tortillas

Lime

Sour cream

Slaw

 

Combine the Rotel, lemon juice, and cumin, chili and or adobo and Tequila. Pour into a frying pan.  Gently place the fish in and bring to a simmer allowing the juices to cook down until fish is nice and flaky.

Remove from heat and chop the fish into the sauce.  Serve with lime, coleslaw or shredded cabbage & sour cream.

 

I used hard tacos because I had them on hand, but prefer soft corn tortillas.  Try finding a Hispanic store and buying them fresh made – YUM!

 

Thanks go to my friend Amanda who told me how easy this is to do!!

 

Enjoy!