Review: Chicken & Veg Stir Fry with Udon Noodles – Anne Burrell

stirfry

Chicken and Vegetable Stir-Fry with udon noodles – Anne Burrell

Recently my husband was out of town for a couple of weeks and I might have binge watched America’s Worst Cooks on the Food Network, ya now…maybe.  OK, I did!  I had never seen the show and enjoyed it, the mentors do a great job teaching basics like knife skills, definitions, and styles of cooking.  I have been holding my knife wrong and now when I stick my finger out on the the blade I can visualize Anne Burrell running down to paint my finger with red marker and I pull it back in.    I am a pretty decent cook and comfortable in the kitchen, but I was reminded that most of the difficulty in the kitchen is in our minds.  So, i encourage you to hop in there and be adventurous.  It just seems scary, but once you step out and try you will be surprised and delighted.

One of the recipes Anne Burrell made was a simple stir-fry.  I gave it a try this week and think you will find it an easy and yummy meal to fix any night of the week.

Time: 30 minutes

Ease: Easy

Review:  This dish was made to be a substitute for Carry-out and I think it did a nice job.  It was quick and easy to prepare, full of flavor, and had that Take-away/Carry-out feel.  I realized a little too late that I had forgotten to buy edamame, but it still had a nice blend of textures and flavor.  I think this is a dish you will be able to play with and make your own.  Some of you will want a spicier dish, try adding chopped Jalapeños  as a garnish to complement the one in the dish.

Tips:  Mise en Place – A French term meaning “putting in place”.  You know all those little bowls with the prepped ingredients that you see on the cooking shows? That is a Mise en Place.  This is a huge time saver and sometimes a dish saver!  When you are cooking and a lot of things are going on you will be glad you already have your items prepped and ready to go.

  • Read your recipe
  • Prepare each recipe item and place in a small bowl or dish
  • Before you begin cooking, double check and make sure you have every ingredient that was listed prepared and ready to go in your dish
  • Keep the prepared items close by; at your stove, a nearby counter etc.  This way you save time by having it at hand.
  • Now start cooking.  As you get to each step just grab the right bowl and add it in.

Enjoy!


Lisa received her Health Coach Certification from the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute, founded by world-renowned physician and author, Dr. William Sears. The Institute is a leader in science-based health and wellness education that focuses on the four pillars of health; Lifestyle, Exercise, Attitude and Nutrition (L.E.A.N.). A certification by the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute is obtained only after completing the extensive course work and meeting all requirements. Once certified, a Health Coach possesses the knowledge, tools and resources to make a positive difference in the health of others.

The information in this blog is educational and not meant to diagnose, treat, or mitigate symptoms.

I offer individual coaching sessions and virtual health coach sessions through Zoom, if you are not local, as well as group sessions, workshops, and special events. I would love to help you on your journey towards health and wellness. Contact me for more information.


All photos are by me, Lisa Wright Burbach –  Feel free to share, but please give credit to the source.  Thank you.

Review: Portobello Mushroom Tacos with Salsa Verde – Forks Over Knives

forks-tacos-copy

tomatillo-salsa-copy

poblano-copy

Portobello Mushroom tacos with Salsa Verde – Forks over Knives

My husband and I are on the journey of eating a more whole food, plant based diet and I have to say we are enjoying it!  There were doubts in the beginning, but we made gradual changes, which I highly recommend.  Most people are not ready to jump in all at once into a big change, but gradual changes can often help us stay the course. Try starting with Meatless Mondays!

I am finding that it is easier to eat healthy foods than to find healthy foods.  The stores are filled with items with suspect ingredients, restaurants have sparse healthy choices at best and it can even be hard to find recipes that are easy and “normal”.  Many of the recipes I have found are pretty exotic, but with a shift in our culture towards eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes I expect the options to improve.  Today’s recipe review is a winner and even my meat loving man really enjoyed it!


Respecting Copyright laws, I don’t publish full exact recipes unless I can find an online link or have permission from the source, so I have provided the pieces of information for you to pull the recipe together.

  • Grilled Portobello mushrooms
  • Corn tortillas
  • Salsa Verde – The recipe can be fond in the Forks Over Knives Cookbook.  I have provided a link to a similar salsa below.
  • Top with lettuce, red onion or anything you see fit to use.  We also used radishes and mix of shredded cabbage with red onion, cilantro and lime juice. It provided a nice zing and texture.

Tomatillo Salsa – Food and Wine.  This recipe is similar to the one by Forks Over Knives.  Try adding lime zest and using green onions in place of onion.  Have fun with this recipes and play with the ingredients.

Time: 1 Hour marinade/ 10-15 minutes

Ease: Easy-moderate – This is really an easy recipe, but if you are unfamiliar with portobello mushrooms or tomatillos it could feel challenging.  Just relax, follow the directions, and enjoy.

Review:  As much as we are trying to reduce our meat consumption, my men folk aren’t quite on board for extreme reductions.  This week my husband and son were going to be away from home and I planned this awesome dish for myself, but then the hubs came home.  I gently informed him that I wasn’t changing the plan and he would like it.  He loved it!  The mushrooms made this feel like a more hearty dish and once we added all the other yummy stuff – don’t forget the salsa!!, the tacos felt like we had stepped into a restaurant for dinner.  Did I mention the salsa?  It is a must, it really rounds out the dish.  The recipe calls for the salsa, lettuce and red onion to top the tacos, but we found adding the cabbage and radishes gave this dish more texture and flavor.  I highly recommend this dish, it is delicious, easy, healthy, and WHPB (whole food, plant based). Be adventurous and let your meat eaters try it.

Tips: It is important to have good tools in your kitchen and two handy tools are a zester and good juicer.  My juicer (known as a fruiter in our home) was my grandmothers and the difference is significant.  Older tools like graters and juicers used thicker metal and real metal.  I find my older tools at estate sales.

Forks Over Knives offers a cooking class that I would love to take and you may want to consider.  I’d like to take it to be able to help others be more confident using grains, legumes, veggies, etc. and empower people to make health their habit, even in the kitchen.  (I am not being paid or endorsed by Forks Over Knives, I just liked the recipe)

Enjoy


Lisa received her Health Coach Certification from the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute, founded by world-renowned physician and author, Dr. William Sears. The Institute is a leader in science-based health and wellness education that focuses on the four pillars of health; Lifestyle, Exercise, Attitude and Nutrition (L.E.A.N.). A certification by the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute is obtained only after completing the extensive course work and meeting all requirements. Once certified, a Health Coach possesses the knowledge, tools and resources to make a positive difference in the health of others.

The information in this blog is educational and not meant to diagnose, treat, or mitigate symptoms.

I offer individual coaching sessions and virtual health coach sessions through Zoom, if you are not local, as well as group sessions, workshops, and special events. I would love to help you on your journey towards health and wellness. Contact me for more information.


All photos are by me, Lisa Wright Burbach –  Feel free to share, but please give credit to the source.  Thank you.

A Look at Superfoods: Salmon

bbd salmon2

TRIVIA & TIDBITS

  • The Chinook Salmon is Oregon’s State fish.
  • Wild salmon are pinker because of their diet which is richer in Astaxanthin, like eating lots of carrots and turning orange.
  • People who eat foods high in Omega 3 tend to have longer Telomeres.  Telomeres are protective caps of repetitive DNA at the end of chromosomes and the length of telomeres. Telomeres shortening is associated with mortality, aging, and related diseases.
  • Plants with Omega 3 are healthy, but have Alpha Linolenic Acid (ALA) and not EPA and DHA found in fatty fishes.  EPA/DHA is utilized in our bodies “as is”, but ALA must be converted by our bodies in to EPA/DHA before being utilized.  In the conversion process only about 4% of the Omega-3 are converted to DHA.
  • Wild fish have healthier Omega 3 profiles, are higher in vitamin D, are naturally pinker (more astaxanthin), lower in saturated fats, and not as fatty in general as most farm raised fish.
  • Worried about safe fish?  Here is a pocket resource guide from Monterey Bay Aquarium.
  • Wild Caught Alaskan Salmon has the lowest mercury, below 216 parts per billion.

WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME?

Omega 3 Fatty Acids – The benefits of Omega 3 fatty acids are so numerous that I have provide a link to help get you started learning about it.  I recommend Dr. William Sears book The Omega-3 Effect.

B12 – Maintains healthy nerves and red blood cells, maintain energy levels, is important for healthy cardiovascular health, keeps skin and hair healthy, may help mood.

Vitamin D –  Helps regulate calcium and phosphorus absorption, maintains health teeth and bones, facilitates normal immune function, improved resistance against certain diseases,  may help fight depression and help with weight loss

Astaxanthin – Called the King of Carotenoid (the pigments that give many healthy foods their color) helps keep a strong brain, healthy eyes, supports the immune system, helps keep the lining of the blood vessels smooth, help keep lipids in balance, protects skin from UV damage, and protects cell membranes.

Protein – Protein serves as building blocks for muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, hormones,  and enzymes.  They increases satiety helping us feel more full.

Iodine – crucial to thyroid function and cell metabolism.

Coline – important for normal liver function, supports normal nerve function, brain development, muscle movement and healthy metabolism.

B5  – is beneficial towards alleviating asthma symptoms,  hair loss, and helps with allergies, stress, anxiety as well as beneficial to a healthy cardiovascular system and respiratory system.

Biotin – (B7) helps thicken nails and hair, helps metabolic function, digestive health, important in fetal development, may improve glucose/ blood sugar balance, beneficial to the nervous system, and improves cholesterol levels.

Potassium – Potassium,  Helps the heart, kidneys, cells, digestive system, muscles, and regulates flood balance and blood pressure.  Potassium has may help reduce the risk of stroke.

Manganese – Benefits bone formation, balance of sex hormones,  important in thyroid function, absorption of calcium, metabolism of fat and carbohydrates, helps the immune system, and is important to function of connective tissues.Selenium –  Our bodies need only trace amounts, but it plays an important role of preventing cellular damage from free radicals and supports a strong immune systemPhosphorus – Works closely with calcium for health bones and teeth, is necessary to make protein for growth and repair of cells, important for muscle contractions, steady heartbeat,  helps the body make ATP.


RECIPES

Miso Glazed Broiled Salmon – The Kitchen/Jacques Pepin

Easy Salmon Recipes – Food and Wine Magazine

Foil Wrapped Side of Salmon with Lemon and Rosemary – Emeril

Crispy Salmon with Fennel Slaw – Food and Wine/ Chef Hugh Acheson

Salmon with Brown Sugar and Mustard Glaze – Bobby Flay

25 Best Salmon Recipes – Coastal Living

 


A look at Superfoods

What is a Superfood?  A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources

Inflammation Solution By Dr. William Sears copyright 2015

Prime Time Health – William Sears, MD and Martha Sears RN

Dr Axe Proven Salmon Benefits

Monterey Bay Aquarium


Lisa received her Health Coach Certification from the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute, founded by world-renowned physician and author, Dr. William Sears. The Institute is a leader in science-based health and wellness education that focuses on the four pillars of health; Lifestyle, Exercise, Attitude and Nutrition (L.E.A.N.). A certification by the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute is obtained only after completing the extensive course work and meeting all requirements. Once certified, a Health Coach possesses the knowledge, tools and resources to make a positive difference in the health of others.

The information in this blog is educational and not meant to diagnose, treat, or mitigate symptoms.

Review: Curried Butternut Squash Soup – The Minimalist Baker

curried-butternut-squash-soup

 

Curried Butternut Squash – The Minimalist Baker

Fall is in the air and in our house this begins the tradition of “Soup a Week”.  Each week I make a yummy soup starting in fall all the way through until spring.  I have many “tried and trues” and also love trying new soups.  This soup is quickly becoming a “tried and true” !  It is easy to make, tastes great and is good for you!  Plus it satisfies that fall feeling.  MMMmmmMMM.

Time: 30 minutes

Ease: Easy – the only tricky part is blending at the end.  I have a stick blender and if you don’t have one I suggest getting one. I think it is a must in the kitchen.  It makes life easier and fewer burns and messes.

Review:  This recipe, as with any I have tried by The Minimalist Baker, is easy and delicious.      Once you have the squash prepared the rest of the dish is a piece of cake.  You may worry that the maple syrup will make the soup to sweet, but with the curry it is a nice blend without being too sweet.  Experiment with the amount you like for your tastes.  Over all this is a great soup; filling, delicious, and easy to make.

Tips: Try different types of curries.  I like a sweet curry from Penzey’s Spices, but also use one called Curry Now, which has a punch!  It is fun playing with the flavors and heat levels until you find the perfect one for you.

If you are someone with sensitive skin i recommend baking the butternut squash with skins on and scooping out the contents before making the soup. follow the directions as written, but use your cooked squash.  Sometimes butternut squash makes my skin peel.  You could also wear gloves to prepare it.

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 

All photos are by me, Lisa Wright Burbach – a Burbachulous Photo.  Feel free to share, but please give credit to the source.  Thank you.

A Look at Superfoods: Tofu

tofuSuperfoods: Tofu

A look at Tofu

TRIVIA

  • Tofu contains all 8 essential amino acids
  • Tofu’s first recorded use is 2000 years ago in the Han Dynasty
  • Tofu is made from bean curds, similar to how cheese is made
  • One acre of soybeans can produce 82, 368 crayons
  • Half of the worlds soybeans are grown in the USA
  • Tofu takes on the flavor of whatever it is cooked with

WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME?

Eating Tofu:

  • Lowers LDL
  • Has antioxidant properties which may reduce the risk of some cancers
  • Can decrease bone loss and increase mineral density during menopause
  • High in Phytonutrients
  • Is beneficial to the prostrate and does not put men at risk
  • Improves digestion

 

Calcium – Helps maintain and form healthy teeth and bones, helps with blood clotting, sending and receiving nerve signals, muscle health,  helps keep a steady heartbeat, helps with the release of certain hormones

Iron – Required for the production of red blood cells, helps take oxygen to all the cells of your body, binds with carbon dioxide to take it back to the lungs, plays an important role in the production of enzymes, contributes to normal cognitive function and immunity.

Magnesium –  Is important for muscle function and health, improves energy, and regulates of calcium, potassium, and sodium.

Protein – Protein serves as building blocks for muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, hormones,  and enzymes.  They increases satiety helping us feel more full.

Potassium – Potassium,  Helps the heart, kidneys, cells, digestive system, muscles, and regulates flood balance and blood pressure.  Potassium has may help reduce the risk of stroke.

Manganese – Benefits bone formation, balance of sex hormones,  important in thyroid function, absorption of calcium, metabolism of fat and carbohydrates, helps the immune system, and is important to function of connective tissues.

Selenium –  Our bodies need only trace amounts, but it plays an important role of preventing cellular damage from free radicals and supports a strong immune system

Phosphorus – Works closely with calcium for health bones and teeth, is necessary to make protein for growth and repair of cells, important for muscle contractions, steady heartbeat,  helps the body make ATP.


RECIPES

Tofu Recipes: Easy Tofu Snacks to Make All Week – Huffington Post

Fried Tofu with Spicy Ginger-Sesame Sauce – Food and Wine Magazine

BBQ Tofu Wings – Forks Over Knives

Agave Ginger Tofu and Veggie Stir-Fry – Purple Carrot

General Tso’s Tofu Stir-Fry – The Minimalist Baker


A look at Superfoods

What is a Superfood?  A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources

Inflammation Solution By Dr. William Sears copyright 2015

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/ingredient-focus-tofu

http://www.nasoya.com/tofu-u/classroom/soybean-fun-facts


Lisa received her Health Coach Certification from the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute, founded by world-renowned physician and author, Dr. William Sears. The Institute is a leader in science-based health and wellness education that focuses on the four pillars of health; Lifestyle, Exercise, Attitude and Nutrition (L.E.A.N.). A certification by the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute is obtained only after completing the extensive course work and meeting all requirements. Once certified, a Health Coach possesses the knowledge, tools and resources to make a positive difference in the health of others.

The information in this blog is educational and not meant to diagnose, treat, or mitigate symptoms.

A Look at Superfoods: Garlic

Superfoods: Garlic

superfood-garlic

This Week’s Featured Superfood: Garlic

 

TRIVIA

  • The Fear of garlic is called Alliumphobia
  • The stronger the aroma, the stronger the benefits
  • Was an givent to ancient Olympic athletes in Greece as a performance enhancer
  • Dates back to 2000 BC in China
  • British Royals never eat garlic out of a concern over bad breath.  The chef is to never use it
  • The juice is used as an adhesive in mending glass and porcelain
  • For centuries it has been believed that garlic wards of evil, especially werewolves, demons, and vampires
  • In Buddhist tradition garlic is thought to stimulate sexual and aggressive desires which could disturb meditation

WHAT’S IN IT FOR ME?

Garlic promotes endothelial health – This helps keep arteries from getting stiff.  The endothelium is an important part of our blood vessels, working ike a pharmacy to our bodies.  Just as long as you don’t block it with plaque.

Cardiovascular heath – Increases HDL while lowering LDL, lowers Triglycerides ,lowers blood pressure, and lowers platelet aggregation

Decrease inflammation – Contains a unique suffer compound which reduces inflammation

May improve bone health due to the zinc, manganese, and b6

Reduction in Stomach Cancer – A study in 2014 of the Korean population who consume garlic daily.

Manganese –  Benefits bone formation, balance of sex hormones,  important in thyroid function, absorption of calcium, metabolism of fat and carbohydrates, helps the immune system, and is important to function of connective tissues.

Fiber – fiber is an important and necessary part of our diet and most of us don’t get enough. Known as roughage or bulk it is the parts of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes that our bodies can’t digest.  We need both soluble and insoluble fiber to be health.  soluble fiber dissolves in water and becomes gel like and helps our glucose levels and cholesterol.  insoluble fiber helps our digestive system move along and bulks up our stool.  fiber helps our bowl movements be regular, lower cholesterol, maintain blood sugar levels, and provide satiety which can help control our weight.

B6 – protects the immune system, helps with PMS, has positive effects on metabolism, and is beneficial towards mental disorders, kidney health, hormone balance, helps adrenal function, helps in the the production of neurotransmitters

Selenium – Our bodies need only trace amounts, but it plays an important role of preventing cellular damage from free radicals and supports a strong immune system.

Summary: While I wouldn’t expect to ward off vampires there are many great reasons to eat garlic!  Garlic is an anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant, and anticancer superfood powerhouse and studies are still being done which show it may help protect against Alzheimers too.  Keep in mind that the more you cook it the lower the benefits and that for some it can upset the gut. Garlic in large doses  can reduce blood clotting so people taking anticoagulants should consult their physician.


RECIPES

How to Roast Garlic – The Kitchn

Garlic and Rosemary Grilled Chicken with Scallops – Bon Appetit

Roasted Garlic Soup – Guy Fieri

Garlic Roasted Potatoes – Ina Garten

Wok Fried Shrimp with Garlic – Saveur


A 16 week look at Superfoods

What is a Superfood?  A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources

Inflammation Solution By Dr. William Sears copyright 2015

https://authoritynutrition.com/11-proven-health-benefits-of-garlic/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garlic


Lisa received her Health Coach Certification from the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute, founded by world-renowned physician and author, Dr. William Sears. The Institute is a leader in science-based health and wellness education that focuses on the four pillars of health; Lifestyle, Exercise, Attitude and Nutrition (L.E.A.N.). A certification by the Dr. Sears Wellness Institute is obtained only after completing the extensive course work and meeting all requirements. Once certified, a Health Coach possesses the knowledge, tools and resources to make a positive difference in the health of others.

The information in this blog is educational and not meant to diagnose, treat, or mitigate symptoms.

A Look at Superfoods: Oatmeal

Superfoods: Oatmeal

oatmeal

A 16 week look at Superfoods

 


This Week’s Featured Superfood: Oatmeal

I hated otameal as a kid, but as an adult I really love it and find it to be a comfort food, soothing and warm. I also enjoy the flavor possibilities, every day something different, if I want.  Understanding that oatmeal is rich in vitamins and minerals as well as fiber and protein, which makes it even better and a great brainy breakfast!

Trivia

  • Oatmeal is a whole grain! You can buy rolled or steal cut, but they still have the bran/germ
  • Eaten three hours before working out some studies show it may help improve endurance
  • A daily bowl of unrefined whole grain cereals has been shown to reduce heart failure by 29%
  • The Ancient Greeks were the first people to make something similar to the oatmeal we eat today, a type of warm porridge
  • 75% of all US families have oatmeal in their homes right now

 

What’s in it for me?

Beta Glucan , a soluble fiber that binds with cholesterol to help keep it from being absorbed in the body.  Beta Glucan also helps fight certain cancers, infections, stabalizes blood sugar,

Avenanthramides- Antioxident properties as well as anti-inflammitory benefits.  Helps with cardiovascular health.  Help prevent free radical damage, May help prevent atherosclerosis.

Protein –  4 grams.  Protein serves as building blocks for muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, hormones,  and enzymes.  They increases satiety helping us feel more full.

Manganese –  Benefits bone formation, balance of sex hormones,  important in thyroid function, absorption of calcium, metabolism of fat and carbohydrates, helps the immune system, and is important to function of connective tissues.

Fiber – fiber is an important and necessary part of our diet and most of us don’t get enough. Known as roughage or bulk it is the parts of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes that our bodies can’t digest.  We need both soluble and insoluble fiber to be health.  soluble fiber dissolves in water and becomes gel like and helps our glucose levels and cholesterol.  insoluble fiber helps our digestive system move along and bulks up our stool.  fiber helps our bowl movements be regular, lower cholesterol, maintain blood sugar levels, and provide satiety which can help control our weight.

Summary: A nice warm bowl of oatmeal is a filling choice with studies showing that it keeps people more satisfied for longer than many other choices.  It a meal that can help lower cholesterol, improve both HDL and LDL, reduce cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and help prevent certain cancers.  Combined with a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables oatmeal is a great tool to add to your self care regime!

As easy as it is to make oatmeal try to use whole oats or steel cut oats and avoid the instant to get the most nutrients possible.


Recipes

13 Insanely Cleaver Oatmeal Tricks you need to try – Buzzfeed

Refrigerator Oatmeal – Kitchen Confidential (use the basic recipe and try your own flavors)

Carrot Cake Oatmeal – Lauren’s Latest

20 Savory Oatmeals – Eat This, Not That

Savory Curry Cashew Oatmeal – Eating Well Magazine

 

Try making an oatmeal bar for your family one Saturday morning.  Let everyone make  there own creation and then tell the family about it over breakfast.


What is a Superfood?

A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources:

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2009/12/The-Immune-Enhancing-Benefits-of-Beta-Glucans/Page-01

Health Benefits of Manganese

 

 

A Look at Superfoods: Olive Oil

Superfoods: Olive Oil

olive oil

A 16 week look at Superfoods


This Week’s Featured Superfood: Olive Oil

Olive oil has been used for thousands of years and is at  the heart of the well researched Mediterranean Diet, which is a heart healthy, longe life way of eating.  Though olive oil contains almost no vitamins or minerals it is still considered a superfood due to the tremendous amount of health benefits.  Olive is a mono-unsaturated fat, an Omega-6 fat, and though beneficial keep in mind it is calorically dense and should be used in moderation.

Olive is what we call a “right fat”, if you aren’t using olive oil it might be time for an oil change!

Trivia

  • The oldest Olive tree in the world is over 5000 years old and still produces fruit, it is on the island of Crete
  • The average lifespan for an Olive tree is 500 years
  • In 1774 Thomas Jefferson planted 1500 Olive stones at Monticello, but they never yielded as the climate was unfavorable
  • Thomas Jefferson said that the Olive tree contributes the most to the happiness of mankind.
  • The smoke point is 365 f
  • For frying use light olive oil
  • For medium heat it is ok to use extra virgin olive oil
  • For dressings and no heat use extra virgin olive oil for more flavor

What’s in it for me?

  • Extra Virgin olive oil is the most nutrient dense of the olive oils
  • Those who consume primarily olive oil and Omega-3 oils have lower blood pressure
  • Regular, moderate consumption of olive oil reduces inflammation
  • Studies show regular, moderate consumption of olive oil to have anti-cancer properties
  • Lowers LDL
  • Raises HDL
  • Keep the lining of the arteries smooth
  • Regular, moderate consumption is proven to reduce the risk of heart disease
  • Olive oil is rich in polyphenols which is the basis for many of the health benefits
  • Protects the lower digestive tract
  • Rich with antioxidants
  • Rich in Vitamin E which protects against pollutants, PMS, eye disorders, Alzheimer’s and Diabetes
  • Rich in Vitamin K which is key in regulating normal blood clotting, and may be helpful for bone health and reduce bone loss
  • Olive oil can increase feelings of satiety and fullness
  • Helps create more regular stools
  • A study in the American Journal of Nutrition found that just smelling olive oil helped in weight loss!

Learn more about olive oil at the California Olive Oil Council

 


Recipes

Canal House Classic House Vinaigrette,  I like to substitute balsamic vinegar or flavored Balsamic for variety

Olive Garden’s Capellini Pomodoro

The 10 Best Olive Oil Recipes, the Gaurdian

Orange Olive Oil Cake  (for a treat)

Chimichurri

One of our favorite ways to consume olive oil is with a fresh-baked whole grain bread and dip it right into the oil.  Yum!


What is a Superfood?

A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olive_oil

http://epochproducts.com/blog/the-health-benefits-of-extra-virgin-olive-oil/

What Does “Extra Virgin” Mean?

Sears, William MD, Sears, Martha, RN – Prime-Time Health 2010 Little Brown and Company

DeWitt, Dave, The Founding Foodies, 2010, Sourcebooks

 

A Look at Superfoods: Broccoli

Superfoods: Broccoli

Broccoli

A 16 week look at Superfoods

 


This Week’s Featured Superfood: Broccoli

Broccoli is an amazing superhero of superfoods filled with vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients with only a small amount of calories per serving!  You should definitely eat your broccoli!   Broccoli retains the most nutritional value when eaten raw, but if you don’t care for it raw you can lightly steam it and retain much of the goodness!

Trivia

  • Did you know that Thomas Jefferson planted Broccoli at Monticello in as early as 1767?
  • The word broccoli comes from the Italian “broccolo” meaning “The flowering crest of cabbage”.
  • Broccoli was popular in Italy as far back as the 6th century, but was slow reaching the rest of the world.
  • Broccoli is a good source of both soluble and insoluble fiber!

 

What’s in it for me?

Potassium , 288 grams of potassium in one cup!  That is a lot.  Potassium,  Helps the heart, kidneys, cells, digestive system, muscles, and regulates flood balance and blood pressure.  Potassium has may help reduce the risk of stroke.

Vitamin C, one cup has 135% of the Daily Value- Good for eye health, cardiovascular health,  repairs and regenerates tissue, decreases LDL, decrease triglycerides, is an antioxidant working against free radicals and may protect against certain types of cancer.  Vitamin C also may help reduce the effects of nitrates in food and aids in the absorption of Iron.

Vitamin A  11-13% DV– Vital in the growth of bone, key for good vision, important for a healthy immune system,  helps our skin and mucus membranes by protecting against bacteria and viruses and is helpful in reproduction.

Lutine -Zeaxanthin –  may help prevent age related Macular Degeneration and cataracts and may help prevent clogging of the arteries of the neck and may help the health of your skin.

Protein –  4 grams.  Protein serves as building blocks for muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, hormones,  and enzymes.  They increases satiety helping us feel more full.

Sulforaphane – An antioxidant, sulforaphane is thought to reduce the risk of breast, bladder, colon and prostate cancer!

Fiber – fiber is an important and necessary part of our diet and most of us don’t get enough. Known as roughage or bulk it is the parts of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes that our bodies can’t digest.  We need both soluble and insoluble fiber to be health.  soluble fiber dissolves in water and becomes gel like and helps our glucose levels and cholesterol.  insoluble fiber helps our digestive system move along and bulks up our stool.  fiber helps our bowl movements be regular, lower cholesterol, maintain blood sugar levels, and provide satiety which can help control our weight.

Summary: Eating broccoli may help lower cholesterol, reduce the risk of certain cancers, is good for the immune system, may improve blood pressure, kidney function, and heart health!  Pile it on!!


Recipes

Pan Steamed Broccoli – Alton Brown

10 Family Friendly Broccoli recipes – Real Simple

Broccoli with Preserved Lemon Yogurt – Food and Wine Magazine

Garlic Parmesan Roasted Broccoli – Damn Delicious (Unsolicited side note, I love this blog!! We have never had a bad recipe from it.  Seriously y’all, cook her stuff!)

Southern Broccoli Salad – Paula Deen

Don’t forget the veggie tray!  Make your own dressings, they are very easy and you can avoid preservitives, additives, hydrogenated fats and gmos!


What is a Superfood?

A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!


Sources:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/11/09/broccoli-benefits.aspx

http://www.livescience.com/45408-broccoli-nutrition.html

http://www.phytochemicals.info/phytochemicals/sulforaphane.php

http://www.choosemyplate.gov/protein-foods

Sears, William MD, Sears, Martha, RN – Prime-Time Health 2010 Little Brown and Company

DeWitt, Dave, The Founding Foodies, 2010, Sourcebooks

 

A Look at Superfoods: Avocado

Superfoods: Avocado 

avocado

A 16 week look at Superfoods

 


This Week’s Featured Superfood: Avocado

Avocado’s can sometimes be vilified because of the high fat content, but have no fear this superfood is here to save the day!  Avocados contain 20 essential nutrients, have more potassium than bananas, and contain vitamins A, Bs, E plus folic acid.  Enjoy, but as with anything remember moderation.

Mono-unsaturated Fats –  Shown to be beneficial to the heart when eaten in moderation and a replacement for saturated fats (though recent research is showing saturated fat to be safer than once thought).  Can help lower LDL cholesterol and reduce risks of stroke and heart attack, may improve function of blood vessels and may help insulin levels

Potassium –  Helps the heart, kidneys, cells, digestive system, muscles, and regulates flood balance and blood pressure.  Potassium has may help reduce the risk of stroke.

Vitamin C – Good for eye health, cardiovascular health,  repairs and regenerates tissue, decreases LDL, decrease triglycerides, is an antioxidant working against free radicals and may protect against certain types of cancer.  Vitamin C also may help reduce the effects of nitrates in food and aids in the absorption of Iron.

Vitamin A – Vital in the growth of bone, key for good vision, important for a healthy immune system,  helps our skin and mucus membranes by protecting against bacteria and viruses and is helpful in reproduction.

Lutine -Zeaxanthin –  may help prevent age related Macular Degeneration and cataracts and may help prevent clogging of the arteries of the neck and may help the health of your skin.

Magnesium – Is important for muscle function and health, improves energy, and regulates of calcium, potassium, and sodium.


Recipes

Spicy Avocado and Peas Tea Sandwiches – Food and Wine Magazine

avocado Hummus Dip – Food and Wine Magazine

Avocado Baked Eggs – Six Sisters Stuff

Pink Grapefruit and Avocado Salad – Eating Well Magazine

Good Green Tea Smoothie – Eating Well Magazine

and don’t forget Avocado toast and Guacamole!


What is a Superfood?

A superfood is defined as a nutrient-rich food considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being – Mcmillian Dictionary.

Dr. William Sears, in his book Prime Time Health, describes Superfoods as:

  • Nutrient Dense
  • Nutrients that have proven benefits
  • Made by nature, not a factory
  • Taste good & satisfying
  • May be able to be prepared in a variety of ways
  • Contains no ingredients harmful to health

While we receive vitamins, minerals, proteins, and essential fats from our foods, some foods have been proven to provide extra health benefits, these foods are the superfoods. They have properties that  may be anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and anti-Alzheimer, lower highs, and raise lows in our body.

Let’s be clear, when I say superfood I do not mean magical foods that cure-all, nor do I  mean a diet consisting of one food, like the old “Grapefruit Diet”.  The truth is, that these foods work best when part of a healthy, whole food, plant-based diet full of variety and by diet I mean lifestyle eating habits, not a short-term solution.  Just eat food that rots, but eat it before it does!